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PI Original
by Ellyn Fortino
12:31pm
Fri Jan 23

State Report Examines Potential Impact Of Exelon Illinois Nuclear Plant Closures

Progress Illinois takes a look at a recent study by four state agencies exploring how the state's economy and environment as well as electric prices, generation capacity and service reliability could be impacted if Exelon retires three of its six Illinois nuclear plants prematurely.

Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
6:58pm
Tue Jan 20

Environmental Concerns Swirl Around Mission Hills Development Plan, Opponents Urge Cook Co. Board To Delay Vote (UPDATED)

Residents of Mission Hills Country Club Village in unincorporated Northbrook want Cook County commissioners to delay a vote on a new housing development proposed for their community.

Northbrook-based Red Seal Development wants to build a 137-unit housing development that includes town homes, duplexes and single-family homes on about 44 acres of land at Mission Hills, a complex that currently features 781 condominiums and town homes as well as a separately-owned, 18-hole golf course.

Red Seal is seeking approval from the Cook County Board for zoning changes that would pave the way for the project, which would involve building on half of the existing golf course.

The Cook County Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA) voted unanimously to advance Red Seal's proposal back in December. As a result, the Cook County Board's Zoning and Building Committee is slated to consider the project at its meeting on Wednesday morning. If the committee approves the project, it could go before the full Cook County Board for consideration later in the day.

Mission Hills Openlands, a group of residents leading the effort against the proposed development, claims the project would threaten the environment and property values in the community and lead to more flooding problems, among other concerns.

"What they're doing is an environmental travesty," stressed Mission Hills Openlands founder Karen Jump. "They would be clear cutting about 500 trees and taking 44 acres of open lands and putting it under asphalt and concrete. And we're in a very short distance to the Des Plaines River, and there's flooding all around us."

Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
2:35pm
Fri Jan 9

Maryland Gov. O'Malley Talks Possible 2016 Presidential Run, Progressive Values In Chicago (VIDEO)

Outgoing Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley is "seriously considering" a 2016 bid for the White House, the Democrat told an audience at the University of Chicago's Institute of Politics on Thursday night.

"I'm very seriously considering running in 2016," O'Malley said at the packed discussion focused on "progressive politics in a post-Obama world."

"Right now, my primary responsibility is to move my family back to Baltimore, which I will do in another week," added O'Malley, who leaves office January 21. "So I am going to be taking some time over the next couple of months to get my family re-situated and make us well and get us back to the city where we all feel comfortable, but I'm very seriously looking at it is what I would say."

Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
4:04pm
Mon Dec 8, 2014

Report: 'Ambitious' Growth In U.S. Wind Energy Needed To Address Climate Change

If 30 percent of the nation's electricity came from wind energy by 2030, the country would sharply cut global warming pollution and meet carbon-reduction targets in the Environmental Protection Agency's proposed Clean Power Plan.

That's according to a recent report by the Environment Illinois Research and Education Center, which analyzed the potential benefits of a scenario in which wind power supplied 30 percent of U.S. electricity needs by 2030. Wind power currently generates 4 percent of the country's electricity.

Achieving 30 percent wind energy by 2030 would reduce U.S. power-plant carbon pollution to 40 percent below 2005 levels, according to the report. And those projected carbon reductions would be more than enough to comply with the EPA's proposed Clean Power Plan regulations, which look to slash CO2 emissions from existing U.S. power plants to 30 percent below 2005 levels by 2030.

"That much wind power would help states meet and exceed the carbon dioxide emission reductions called for by the Environmental Protection Agency's draft Clean Power Plan, and help the nation meet its commitment to cut U.S. carbon pollution by 26 to 28 percent by 2025" as part of a climate change agreement with China announced by President Barack Obama in November, the report reads.

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