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Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
4:56pm
Mon Sep 12

Report: Paid Sick Time Beneficial To Workers And Businesses

As paid sick leave laws continue to gain traction across the United States, a recent report finds such policies to be a win-win for workers and their employers.

For its report, the Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR) examined over a dozen scholarly and policy research articles covering the health, economic and social benefits of paid sick time.

"Seeing the research brought together, from a range of disciplines, makes a striking case for universal access to paid sick days as a low-cost strategy for improving health and economic well-being," IWPR Vice President and Executive Director Barbara Gault said in a statement.

The think tank's analysis came shortly Chicago passed legislation mandating earned paid sick time and as commissioners in Cook County are set to vote on similar policy on October 5. Chicago was the 34th jurisdiction in the United States to guarantee paid sick days.

Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
1:10pm
Wed Sep 7

O'Hare Contract Workers Allege 'Rampant Wage Theft' (UPDATED)

Contract workers at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport are allegedly facing "rampant wage theft," and they are calling on the city and state to investigate the issue.

O'Hare workers and SEIU* Local 1 officials discussed the wage theft allegations Wednesday morning and announced filings of wage theft complaints with the Illinois Labor Department and Chicago Department of Business Affairs and Consumer Protection.

The charges include 60 Chicago minimum wage ordinance violations and 20 Illinois Labor Department violations, according to the union. 

At issue are security officers, baggage handlers, cabin cleaners, wheelchair attendants and other workers who are employed by O'Hare contractors, including Universal Security, Prospect Airport Services, and Scrub, Inc. The union recently conducted a wage theft survey of about 300 contracted O'Hare workers, finding that they collectively lost $1 million in wages last year.

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