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Jackson County
PI Original
by Ellyn Fortino
5:14pm
Tue May 3, 2016

Illinois Budget Impasse 'Destroying' State's Mental Health Services, Providers Say

As the state budget impasse enters its eleventh month, Progress Illinois examines how mental health services and providers have been impacted.

Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
12:48pm
Wed Nov 4, 2015

Report: Most Waitlists For Housing Choice Vouchers Closed In Illinois

As demand for federal housing vouchers intensifies in Illinois, residents in need of affordable rental housing are encountering mostly closed waitlists for the Housing Choice Voucher program across the state, a new report shows.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development operates the Housing Choice Voucher program, which provides rental assistance to low-income families and is administered locally by public housing authorities (PHAs).

Of the 71 PHAs with active Housing Choice Voucher programs in Illinois, 51, or 72 percent, have closed voucher waitlists, according to the report from Housing Action Illinois and the Social IMPACT Research Center.

"This means that people in need of affordable rental housing in most every part of Illinois do not have the opportunity to even get in line to secure a federally-funded subsidy that would alleviate their poverty and put their household in a better position to thrive," the report authors wrote.

Quick Hit
by Ellyn Fortino
3:18pm
Thu Jan 30, 2014

New Report Provides Sobering Look At Illinois Poverty Trends Over 50 Years

A new report from the Social IMPACT Research Center at the Heartland Alliance finds that the poverty rate in Illinois, at about 15 percent in 2012, is the same as it was in 1960.

The report, which comes on the heels of the War on Poverty's 50th anniversary, also shows that 388,000 Illinoisans still live in poverty despite having someone in their household who works full-time.  

“Today, the jobs that are available at the low-skilled end of the economy simply don’t provide wages and benefits that create economic security,” Social IMPACT Research Center Director Amy Terpstra said in a statement. “What this means is that, in Illinois, you can work full time and still be living in poverty.”

Since 1960, the number of working age Illinois men and women in poverty has increased, poverty rates have barely changed for African Americans and Latinos, and women are still more likely to be poor than men, the report showed.